In CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL. 1.3 Ask and answer questions about

In this lesson plan, ESL students will learn the vocabulary for different facial expressions. Through activities that require speaking, listening, reading and writing, ESL students will get ample opportunities to practice the vocabulary.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify basic facial expressions by name
  • Respond with an appropriate facial expression in conversation
  • Describe facial expressions appropriately within writing and drawing

Length

45-60 minutes

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Curriculum Standards

  • CCSS.

    ELA-Literacy.SL.1.1

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.

    1.3

Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood.

Vocabulary

  • Smile
  • Frown
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Embarrassed
  • Excited
  • Scared

Materials

  • Pictures of different facial expressions (digital or hand-drawn)
  • Mini whiteboards (one per student)
  • Dry erase markers (one per student)
  • Blank writing paper with square for illustrations (one per student)

Activities

Explicit Vocabulary Instruction

  • One by one, display the pictures of different facial expressions.

    After posting each picture, complete the following steps:

    • Say the name of the expression (e.g. surprised face).
    • Ask students to say the name of the expression.

    • Label the expression.
    • Discuss when someone would have this expression.
    • Ask students to talk about a time when they or someone they have known has made this expression.

Name that Expression

  • Distribute mini whiteboards and dry erase markers to students.
  • For the first round, make one of the facial expressions. Students will write which expression you are making.

    Students will hold up their responses. Check for understanding and address misconceptions as they arise.

  • For the second round, say one of the facial expressions. Students will write which expression you are saying. Students will hold up their responses. Check for understanding and address misconceptions as they arise.

  • For the third round, describe a situation. Students will write which expression someone would likely make in the situation. Students will hold up their responses.

    Check for understanding and address misconceptions as they arise.

    • Examples of situations could include: ‘A boy stubbed his toe,’ or, ‘You just got a new puppy.’

Writing Activity

  • Distribute writing paper to students.

    Explain that they are going to write a sentence about someone making a facial expression of their choice.

  • Students will draw an appropriate illustration to go with their sentence.
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